100 Years Old: Cadick Apartments

In some ways, a century ago was not that different than today. With downtown flourishing and residents looking for affordable housing, the Cadick Apartments were part of a building boom that generated several rental units.

Architect sketch of the Cadick Apartments , a new “Florentine” style building

The New Cadick was the brainchild of A. C. Hassensall with the help of famed local architect W. E. Russ.  Built in the Beaux Arts style, it was a 3-story brick structure with a tiled roof.  Stone on the first floor has “Cadick Apartments” carved in it, and the building also has some intricate brickwork.

Cadick Apartments under construction January 1917

The new apartments were built from 1916-1917, and contained 14 units.  Some of the more notable features included Murphy beds and mahogany wood trim in each apartment.  The first floor featured leasing offices and space for a doctors offices.  The Cadick also had a full basement that included a dining hall and laundry room.

1st St from Locust during the 1937 Flood. McCurdy at right and Cadick beyond the old Elks Home at left.
Apartments today 100 years young (photo from Vanderburgh County Assessor)

The Personal Side of Glenn Black: Indiana’s Archaeologist Revealed

Glenn Black

Thursday, February 9, 6:00 p.m.
Willard Library Browning Gallery
21 First Avenue◊Evansville, Indiana 47710

Using newly-acquired images and artifacts, Mike Linderman, Western Regional Manager for Indiana State Historic Sites, will discuss the work of  Glenn Black , a pioneering archaeologist who conducted several decades of scientific excavations at Angel Mounds before his death in 1964.

This event will be only the second time the items have been shown publicly, with many new ones added since the first program. Several of their personal items will be on display, many from their home at Angel Mounds.

This program is sponsored by Willard Library, the Vanderburgh County Historical Society, and Angel Mounds; it is free and open to the public, but reservations are appreciated; to register, visit www.willard.lib.in.us or call (812) 425-4309, ext. 117.

The Personal Side of Glenn Black:  Indiana’s Archaeologist Revealed

In 2015 a large collection of Glenn and Ida Black’s personal items were offered to the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites from a Great-Niece living in Indianapolis.  Earlier attempts to find their personal belongings came up with a story of all of it being destroyed and thrown away.  What was found were over 1,700 images on photos and slides of their lives, the first time that any of them had ever been seen outside of the family.  The photos and slides document their time at Angel Mounds, time with their families before moving to the site and trips with Eli and Ruth Lilly across the country.

 

Barwe Butcher Shop

Barwe construction 1904

Frank X. Barwe ran a successful butcher shop in the new town of Howell around the turn of the century. In December 1904 he built a large brick building for his business. The store was located at 211 Broadway Ave on the alley between Delmar Ave and Ewing Ave. A smokehouse and a sausage factory used to stand next door but those are long gone. There were also stables in the rear of the property, but they were destroyed in a fire. An article in the April 17, 1913 newspaper says that there was $500 in damage and Hose House No. 7 (before it relocated to Howell) responded.

Barwe Butcher Shop 1910 Sanborn

 

1926 Ad Barwe

Barwe continued to sell “home killed beef” into the 1930s .  As with many other buildings, the store was renumbered 3118 Broadway Ave when Evansville adopted a new numbering system. He also built a new bungalow in 1930 next door at 3122 Broadway Ave for his personal residence.

Barwe Butcher Shop, with Barwe’s 1930 bungalow next door at right

Barwe retired, passing away in 1937, but his store was used over the years. Frank DeShield’s ran a grocery there in the late 1930s and the Broadway Market operated in the building in the 1940s and 1950s.  Beginning in the mid-1950s, several business tried their luck in the old building including Embry’s Furniture Store, Mary’s Coffee Shop, ABC Motorcycle Sales (later West Side Cycle), and an auto parts supply store, but like many old building the structure has outlasted all its owners.  For some time it has been the home of United Schenk Accounting

 

Celebrate Indiana’s Bicentennial with the Vanderburgh County Historical Society

ice-gorge-1936-2
Ice Gorge in Evansville, IN February 1936
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Wendell Willkie’s Speech at Bosse Field in October 1940

The Vanderburgh County Historical Society (VCHS) and the Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science, team to show never before seen film of Evansville in the 1930s and 1940s. The source 16 MM films were donated to the VCHS by the estate of Janet Noelting Robinson. The Noelting family owned and operated Faultless Caster in Evansville, and Janet’s father, Elmer, began filming in the late 1920s. Most films were of family holidays and vacation, but some were of special events in the Evansville area.

The November 17th presentation in the Evansville Museum’s Koch Immersive Theater begins at 6:00 PM and includes four films. Since seating is limited please call the museum at 812-425-2406 for a complimentary reservation.

The Strike at Faultless Caster in September of 1933 is presented by Jon Carl of FJ Reitz High School. This black and white footage shows strikers in front of Faultless Caster on Stringtown Road. Strikers, many of them women, hold signs and protest their employer. Jon’s presentation will give background and details about the strike, strikers, and owners. `

The Ice Gorge of 1936 is presented by Tom Lonnberg, Curator of History at the Evansville Museum. The Ohio River at Evansville froze over in February of 1936. This motion picture footage shows multiple views of the river and the boats frozen in the water.

The Opening of Washington Elementary School September 1937 presented by Joe Engler of HistoricEvansville.com. This color footage shows students entering the grounds and building of Washington Elementary for the first time. The Noelting family has titled this film Janet’s New School. A young Janet Noelting is seen walking into the new school shown in a near rural setting.

Wendell Willkie Campaigns in Evansville in October 1940 is presented by Dr. Denise Lynn, Professor of History at the University of Southern Indiana. Willkie, an Indiana native, was Franklin Roosevelt’s Republican opponent in the election on 1940. Willkie’ s campaign stopped here for a political rally at Bosse Field. Elmer Noelting filmed the rally in color.

For additional information, check the VCHS web site at www.vchshistory.org or the VCHS Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/vchshistory/.

A History of Local High School Football by Dan Engler

VCHS HS FOOTBALL

Dan Engler’s passion for covering Reitz high school football and sports in general began over 20 years ago. In high school, he played for the Panthers and served on the staff of the Reitz Mirror. Shortly after his graduation in 1996, he created what has become Indiana’s oldest high school football website, ReitzFootball.com.

After creating a sister site now known as AlmanacSports.com, Engler, along with his brother Joe, have chronicled the history of Southwestern Indiana high school football and soccer.

In addition to his online work, Engler’s writing has been published in several local newspapers, including the Evansville Courier & Press. He also worked for the now-defunct NEWS25 Sports Channel providing live statistics for their weekly live games and has refereed football for 20 years.

Dan’s talk will cover all teams with a heavy focus on traditional powerhouses over time.

September 22 @ 6:30 pm8:00 pm  

Willard Library

Facebook Event Page

Schnute, Holtmann Co

The Schnute-Holtmann Co were manufacturers of fine interior woodwork.  William H Schnute established a planning mill on Fourth Ave near Franklin St in the 1890s.  The mill produced building materials such as sashes, lath, stairs–all the quality parts that went into what would now be classified as a well-built older home.

1906 advertisement for Schnute, Holtmann Co
1906 advertisement for Schnute, Holtmann Co

Schnute’s growing enterprise relocated in 1903 and built a new mill occupying the block of Illinois, Heidelbach, Indiana and Lafayette.  The proximity to the Southern Railway enticed the move, and a spur was built connecting the company to the railroad tracks along Division St. The company expanded into building whole houses, but may better remembered for the woodwork done on some well-known buildings around Evansville such as the Germania Maennerchor building, Audubon Apartments and the Boehne residence.

In 1919 the company reorganized as Universal Manufacturing Corp, but that was short lived as the plant closed by the early 1920s.

Universal Manufacturing ad 1919
Universal Manufacturing ad 1919

Around 1925, the Evansville Warehouse Company took over the old factory and used it for storage. It also rented out part of the block to the Creasey Co.  Several of the buildings nearby served a similar purpose for storage and distribution, and the area gained a reputation as a big warehouse district.

Heidelbach Ave c1950. At right is the Evansville Warehouse Co. St Paul Lutheran is in the distant left
Heidelbach Ave c1950. At right is the Creasey Co. St Paul Lutheran is in the distant left (Photo courtesy of Donna Cartwright)

On October 29, 1953 an $800,000 fire took out the majority of the block. It was purported to be started by burglars and was the largest fire since the 1951 Main St Fire. The factory was rebuilt, though not as substantial as the original brick structure. Now a parking lot occupies the former warehouse block, which Vectren likely cleared sometime around 1990.

Remnants of the Evansville Warehouse fire Oct 29, 1953
Remnants of the Evansville Warehouse fire Oct 29, 1953

Schulte House: the 1st Wabash Ave mansion

Charles Schulte was a partner in the Schulte & Reitman sawmill on Ohio St.  Its success made Schulte, who was a native of Prussia, a rich man.  He built his large residence in 1878 in the Italianate style along Wabash Ave between Indiana and Illinois St.  It boasted a fancy veranda, ornamental window heads, and a three-story tower and juxtaposed with the modest working-class homes nearby.

1880 Schulte
The new Schulte residence from the Evansville 1880 Map

Schulte was instrumental in establishing St Boniface parish, along with several other prominent West Siders.  It also interesting to note his partner, Henry Reitman, built his large home just across the street. Many may recall this house just off the Lloyd Expressway that was razed just a few years ago.

c1889
The mansion as it looked around 1889, before the wrap around porch.

Mr. Schulte passed away around the turn of the century and his wife around 1910, so the house became available.  The West Side merchant, William Scherffius, who ran his department store nearby on Franklin St purchased the house.  Immediately he set to remodeling the mansion including the addition of a massive front porch.  At 1400 sq ft, it was the largest in the city.  It was decorated in stone and wrapped most of the house.

new porch 1400 sq ft
Article about new porch encompassing 1,400 sq ft – Evansville Courier 9/22/1912
Wabash Ave, 110 N (1920 Nov)a
Talk about curb appeal.  The updated Scherffius house c1915

Scherffius too passed away sometime around the late 1920s.  The house was purported to be the home of the National Youth Administration, but found its new calling when the Veterans of Foreign War (VFW) purchased the home in 1942. The clubs growth facilitated an addition which was built in 1950 just left/south of the old house, which is still in use today. The organization grew to become the largest chapter of in the United States.

1961
1961 aerial of the club.  The West Branch Library is in the lower right and Reitman’s home (Schulte’s old partner) is in the upper left close to the Expressway

By the mid 1960s the house was deemed “too costly to repair” as plans were made to replace the magnificent home with a simple one-story structure. The old home was torn down in 1966, and the new building was completed later that year adjoining the 1950s addition.

new sketch mar 1966
Sketch of new VFW building March 1966.  The round top part (left) was the 1950 addition.

One final look then & now

doomed
Doomed.  Article about the Schulte/Scherffius home being sentenced
VFW Present day
VFW Present day similar to view above.  The 1950s addition is in the background left

Mailbag: Clearcrest Golf Club

Article about the opening of the Vanderbug Auto Club (Evansville Courier 4/14/1915)
Article about the opening of the Vanderbug Auto Club (Evansville Courier 4/14/1915)

The farmhouse at 10521 Darmstadt Road was part of the Charles Volkman farmstead.  Built in the late 1800s, it encompassed about 80 acres and was situated about 8 miles from downtown Evansville.  The newly formed Vanderbugh Auto club purchased the property in 1915 and remodeled the 2-story farmhouse .  Driver could cruise “through bracing country air” and stop at the auto club for a bite.  Other amenities such as a stocked lake, playground, and tennis courts attracted other people to the club.

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The farmhouse that became an auto club and later Clearcrest Club. Photo c1930

The Vanderburgh Auto Club was short-lived though, because by 1920 the facility operated as the Clear Crest Inn.  It was more of a roadhouse serving food and providing evening entertainment.

Ad for Clear Crest Inn 1920
Ad for Clear Crest Inn 1920

The Evansville Club, a Jewish social club located in what is now the No-Ruz Grotto, was looking for property in the country as a respite from their downtown site.  In 1921, they bought the old auto club, remodeled the clubhouse, and put in a golf course.  The club officially opened as the Clearcrest Country Club in summer 1922.

There was a giant fire June 22, 1939, and eight people barely made it out with their lives.  The buildings were a total loss, but the club rebuilt within a year.  A new clubhouse, designed by Edwin Berendes, is the same one still standing today.

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What remained of Clearcrest after the June 1939 fire
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A map of Clearcrest showing the new clubhouse and the changes to the golf course

The golf course was sold to a private owner around 1990 and was opened to the public. It continued operating for a number of years until it finally closed late Winter 2014. It was sold at auction the next year and is currently slated to become a subdivision.

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The clubhouse 2015 when the property was up for auction

Mike Linderman’s Presentation on January 28th

Upcoming Program:
Angel Mounds’ Mike Linderman will make the following presentation in Willard Library’s Browning Gallery on January 28th at 6:30 PM. Enter at the South entrance.

Francis Martin was a pioneering woman in the field of archaeology, having worked with some of the greats like Dr. Glenn Black at Angel Mounds and doing much independent work in the field in our area. Along with her husband George, Francis traveled around the tri-state region documenting and preserving information on numerous archaeological sites.
This presentation will highlight her career through her own slides, which cover a period of over 50 years. The slides were donated to Angel Mounds State Historic Site after her death in 1999 by her niece. Now digitized, they can be shown again to the public for the first time in over 25 years. Along with showing the slides, the goal is to meet people who knew Francis and help us complete the story of her life, which is somewhat lacking on the personal level.